What Happens if I Relapse?

Getting Back On The Road To Recovery

  • Because programs vary in their philosophies and treatments offered, finding a center that takes a different approach than the last one you went to may produce better results.
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a mode of therapy commonly used to treat addictions. CBT is very useful when it comes to identifying how a person responds to certain triggers — or people, places and things that fuel their desire to use drugs or alcohol. Learning how to respond differently to these triggers, or how to avoid them in the first place, is something that can be worked on during a return visit to rehab.
  • It’s also important to look back at what event or emotions may have led to the relapse and learn how to properly deal with these in the future. It may be that you need to find new ways to cope with stress by exploring relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation and yoga. All of these practices can help recovering addicts manage stressful situations once the treatment program has ended.

What Causes A Relapse?

Relapse after a period of sobriety is an unfortunately common occurrence. Approximately half of all recovering addicts experience a temporary moment of weakness that results in picking up drugs or alcohol again. Knowing some of the red flags can help you avoid this.

Signs that may predict an upcoming relapse include:

  • Not making sobriety your top priority. Without a firm commitment to long-term sobriety, you’re more likely to relapse. To be successful, you must be willing to put in the hard work required to stay sober. This includes attending 12-step meetings, having a committed sponsor and getting therapy or counseling for possible co-occurring mental health conditions, such as depression and anxiety.
  • Not having a support system. A newly sober person needs to have a solid support network right away, as this can make the difference between continued recovery or relapsing back into addiction. Having a support group of others in recovery is vital. Ask your family to keep you accountable, seek spiritual guidance through meditation or religion and join sober group activities.
  • Not wanting to quit for yourself. In some cases, the user enters treatment because they are trying to please their family or friends rather than being committed to quitting for their own sake. Unless someone truly wants to quit for themselves, the risk of relapse is much higher.
  • Not being prepared for life post-treatment. It’s important to create a relapse prevention plan for transitioning back to regular life post-treatment. It is crucial to understand how certain things can sabotage sobriety, such as dysfunctional family dynamics, toxic friendships, social isolation and unhealthy daily routines. Clearly identifying triggers early on can help you protect your newfound sobriety.

I Relapsed…Now What?

  • The first step is to determine whether you need to go back to rehab. If it was an isolated incident and you’re committed to never letting it happen again, you may not need to go back to an inpatient facility.
  • However, if you’ve fallen back into a continued pattern of substance abuse, you might need to get back into a strict treatment program.

“I’ve relapsed many times but this was the longest I’ve stayed sober. If I could do this, anyone could. I almost died, almost went back to jail, almost lost everything [that] I worked so hard to protect. But you can make it back. I did.”

– Heidi D., recovering addict for over 5 years
  • Upon returning to treatment, this time should have a deeper emphasis on therapy, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which has been successful in teaching recovering addicts new behavioral responses to distorted thinking. Other forms of therapy to explore that are available at many treatment programs include art and music therapy, yoga and relaxation techniques, physical fitness and even equine therapy.
  • From the moment you enter treatment after a relapse, the focus should be on the transition back to regular life. You may find that your best option for avoiding relapse is entering a sober living environment for a few months, where accountability and discipline help during those vulnerable first months post-treatment. Also, it would be advantageous to be prepared with an outpatient plan for continuing therapy after you leave.

Get the Help You Need

  • If you’ve already gone through treatment and are struggling with the potential or reality of relapse, there is help available. You should get you enrolled in a treatment program that better suits your needs and that can help you reach sustained sobriety.
  • Contact us now and allow our professionals to find just the right treatment program for you.

Nishan Foundation focuses on providing the most effective, evidence-based treatment, exceeding expectations by paying close attention to four key therapeutic principles

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